Today is Oct. 23

Published 12:35 am Saturday, October 23, 2021

National Make A Difference Day

National Make A Difference Day brings community service to a whole new level each year. Organizations join forces on the fourth Saturday in October to make a difference, big or small.

Millions of people have united in the common mission to improve the lives of others.

For more than 20 years, USA Weekend and Points of Light sponsored National Make a Difference Day. It became the largest national day of community service. However, the two organizations no longer promote the community service weekend. Despite that, the event carries on, thanks to many with like-minded beliefs in their communities.

All across the country, organizations pick up the tools required to help others during this weekend. Sometimes, they pick another weekend in October. However, they do it, they do so making a difference in the lives of others and their communities. The expression of love for each other through support and good ol’ elbow grease is sometimes all we need to make a difference.

 

National Boston Cream Pie Day

National Boston Cream Pie Day serves up a delicious dessert on October 23rd each year. Pie lovers, move along. Cake lovers, pull up a chair. Let’s celebrate the cake with an identity crisis! Boston Cream Pie is a chocolate frosted, custard-filled cake that is loved by millions.

In 1856, at Boston’s Parker House Hotel, French chef Monsieur Augustine Francois Anezin created this pudding and cake combination.

The decadent cake comprises two layers of sponge cake filled with vanilla-flavored custard or creme patisserie. The cake is then topped with a chocolate glaze, such as a ganache or sometimes powdered sugar and a cherry.

 

Mole Day

Mole Day is celebrated annually on October 23 from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m. It celebrates Avogadro’s Number (6.02 x 1023), which is a basic measuring unit in chemistry. Mole Day was created as a way to foster interest in chemistry, and schools throughout the United States and around the world celebrate with various activities related to chemistry and/or moles.

For a given molecule, one mole is a mass (in grams) whose number is equal to the atomic mass of the molecule. For example, the water molecule has an atomic mass of 18, therefore one mole of water weighs 18 grams.

An atom of neon has an atomic mass of 20, therefore one mole of neon weighs 20 grams. In general, one mole of any substance contains Avogadro’s Number of molecules or atoms of that substance. This relationship was first discovered by Amadeo Avogadro (1776-1858) and he received credit for this after his death.

 

Did you know?

The Vision Council notes that roughly 200,000 sports-related eye injuries occur in children each year. Concerned parents should know that estimates from Boston Children’s Hospital suggest that as much as 90 percent of sports eye injuries can be prevented with protective eyewear.