• 84°

Active cases decrease in Orange County

By Dawn Burleigh

As Governor Greg Abbott and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), on Thursday, announced that that State of Texas has administered more than 1 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine—making Texas the national leader in vaccinations, Orange County released numbers showing the total number of cases since March 2020 is still rising while the number of active cases is decreasing.

This milestone comes exactly one month to the day after the first doses arrived at vaccine providers in the state on December 14. According to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data, the Lone Star State has administered more doses than any other state. Among the top 20 states for doses distributed, Texas ranks number one for percentage of doses administered.

“Texas is leading the way for our nation once again,” Abbott said. “This is the biggest vaccination effort we have ever undertaken, and it would not be possible without the dedication and tireless efforts of our healthcare workers. We still have a long road ahead of us, but Texans continue to prove that we are up to this challenge.”

Voluntary vaccination continues throughout the state for front-line health care workers, residents at nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and Texans over 65 or with a chronic medical condition to aid in reducing hospitalizations and protect the health of those in these vulnerable populations. Texas receives more vaccine from the federal government each week and expects the weekly amount to increase in the future. The State of Texas will continue to swiftly distribute these vaccines to reduce hospitalizations and save lives.

In Orange County, the number of active cases saw a significant decrease with 532 less this week at 1,206 compared to 1,738 the week before.

The number of recovered cases increased by 799 this week with a total of 4,560 compared to the total of 3,761 the previous week.

Total number of cases in Orange County since March 2020 is at 5,812 or 6.92% of the population.

As the general population waits for their opportunity to take the COVID-19 vaccination, the CDC shared possible side effects.

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days, according to the CDC website.

Common side effects include pain and swelling on the arm where one gets the injection. Throughout the rest of one’s body, one may experience fever, chills, tiredness or headache.

To reduce pain and discomfort where you got the shot:

  • Apply a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the area.
  • Use or exercise your arm.

Both COVID-19 mRNA vaccines will need two shots to get the most protection. The timing between your first and second shot depends on which vaccine you received. You should get your second shot:

  • for the Pfizer-BioNTech three weeks (or 21 days) after your first shot,
  • for the Moderna one month (or 28 days) after your first shot.

You should get your second shot as close to the recommended 3-week or 1-month interval as possible. However, there is no maximum interval between the first and second doses for either vaccine. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval, according to the CDC. ​