White Bass run expectations high for 2022; here are the local spots

Published 12:24 am Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Anglers across the state look forward to hitting the water each spring for the annual white bass spawning run upstream from reservoirs into rivers and creeks.

Whether it be fishing on the bank, motorized boat or paddle craft, the white bass run can provide an exciting day on the water for new and seasoned anglers alike.

“The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) has received reports that some anglers have started catching white bass since the beginning of February, but the main spawning run does not really get going until water temperatures and flows are just right,” said John Botros, TPWD’s Inland Fisheries River Access Coordinator.

“Some good rains this spring would trigger abundant white bass spawning runs. Anglers should make plans to target this species in rivers and creeks upstream of many of our reservoirs from now until early May.”

White bass, also known as sand bass, are a popular freshwater species preferred by Texas anglers both for sport fishing and for the dinner table.

While most riverside property is privately owned, public access to high-quality white bass runs can be found at many Texas State Parks, Texas Paddling Trails, leased River Access and Conservation Area sites and highway and bridge crossings.

Here are a few locations to get started:

Neches River: Above Lake Palestine, anglers can find public access at Chandler River Park. This RACA site – also supported by the East Texas Woods and Waters Foundation – offers nearly 6,000 feet of river frontage for bank fishing and includes a boat ramp and kayak launch.

Sabine River: Above Toledo Bend Reservoir, anglers can find public access for white bass fishing at the Grand Bluff Boat Ramp, which offers 275 feet of river frontage and a single trailer boat ramp. This RACA site offers free public fishing access.

The daily bag limit for white bass is 25 with a 10-inch minimum length limit.

More information on fishing regulations can be found in the TPWD Outdoor Annual.